First-home buyers borrowing deposit from parents

Shaking Hands for first home buyer borrowing money from parents connect realty blog

According to figures out from Australia this week, in 2017 over 55 percent of first home buyers sought help from their parents to fund their mortgage.  This is a huge leap from 3.3. percent in 2010, and experts say that New Zealand is likely to be the same or even higher. One mortgage lender even suggests that 60-70 percent of New Zealand first home buyers had parental help, and for those under 30 years of age this figure jumped to 80-90 percent because of small KiwiSaver investments.

These statistics really highlights the difficulty for young people to get on the property ladder.  When taking out a home loan to buy a house, it’s typically recommended that you borrow no more than 80% of the property’s value, which means having a 20% deposit.  With average house values in Tauranga sitting at $700,000 a first home buyer would need $140,000 for a deposit. A cheaper home, for example $500,000, will still need a deposit of $100,000.  Given these figures it is easy to understand why first home borrowers need to look to family to borrow their deposit.

The negative side to the story is that most of these loans are on a “pay it back when you can basis” and interest free, which can make it difficult for parents that are also moving onto the next stage of home ownership.  It is also highlighting the gap between the haves and the have-not. Given home ownership is falling in main centres, and many more adults are renting, there is going to be an even wider gap between those who can afford to own property in New Zealand and those who will have to remain renting through their life.

For the full article see the NZ Herald – 

Bank of Mum and Dad: Broker says first-home buyers borrowing $50k to $80K from parents

Top 4 Questions Landlords Ask Property Managers

Top 4 Questions Landlords Ask Property Managers blog title with image of house for connect realty

We have been in the Property Management business for many years, and over these years there have been some key questions that we get asked regularly by landlords and property investors.  So to make it easy for any potential investor or new Landlord, here are the top four questions we get asked:

1. What are your fees?

At Connect Realty we like to keep things simple by using one flat rate.  Traditionally other companies may charge you commission on: maintenance work, monthly admin fee, attending mediations, payment of insurance, completing inspections, payment of rates, advertising packages, credit checks, attending tribunal and payment of body corp fees.  Our rate includes everything and there are no extra fees for any of the above!

2. How Much Will My Property Rent For?

We offer a free Comparative Market Analysis report on the potential rental value of your property. Given our many years of experience in real estate and property management in the Bay of Plenty we know the market inside out.  We can advise you on current rentals for your property type and area.  Our experience has proven invaluable to our Landlords.

3. How Is Maintenance Handled?

We arrange regular planned maintenance, such as minor repairs and preventative maintenance, to minimise problems and ensure your property remains in peak condition.  To carry out this work we use a variety of contractors who are reliable, consistent and offer value for money.  Quotes can be obtained for most maintenance.  Clients can also stipulate a maintenance spending limit or choose to have no maintenance carried out without their approval.  In this case clients will be contacted for all maintenance issues.

The types of renovations, repairs and maintenance that should be carried out can generally be classified as urgent, short term and long term maintenance. Generally urgent and short term issues are those day to days issues which are essential for health and safety and to comply with provisions of the residential tenancies Act.

Long term issues are not considered urgent and clients can address and plan for these at some stage down the line, often between tenancies. These issues are generally communicated to clients after inspections.   Addressing these issues makes the property more tenantable and often improves the likely weekly rent. These issues might include replacing vinyl and carpet which may be damaged or old, repainting the home in attractive colours or patching a wall or room.

Our flexible property management service allows clients to have an agreement with us in advance with regards to who organises what maintenance when it is necessary.  This means you will always know where you stand and you will not have unnecessary costs that you were unaware of.   

4. How Do You Market My Property and How Soon Will It Be Rented?

Our marketing plans includes promoting your property on the main real estate websites www.trademe.co.nz and www.realestate.co.nz and our own website www.connectrealty.co.nz .

The average timeframe to secure tenants is 14-28 days. When tenants vacate they are required to give a minimum of 21 days notice and we begin marketing for new tenants immediately.  The majority of properties we manage have new tenants secured before existing tenants have vacated.  This is especially true in today’s market where there is a shortage of quality rental properties.

Hopefully these answers will help you with those key questions.  For any further property investment advice and/or information about the services we offer as Property Managers please call our office 0800 333 221.  We are always here to help.

Predictions for Tauranga Rental Prices For 2018

photo of tauranga for predictions of rental prices in tauranga connect realty blog

A question we often get asked, by both tenants and landlords, is will rents rise in the coming year?  The simple answer is yes, they will.  Here are some of the reasons why:

As you would have read over summer, Tauranga, just like Auckland, has a serious rental shortage, especially quality rental homes. The shortage is a simple case of supply and demand.  Our region continues to attract record numbers of new ‘migrants’ to our suburbs, but due to lending restrictions, increasing mortgage rates, and a significant increase in house prices, it is difficult for many of these people to buy a home in Tauranga.  Therefore, many families moving here are looking for short or long term rentals.  Their search is made even more difficult because many existing tenants are choosing to stay in their rentals long term, knowing that quality rental properties are hard to come by.  So the usual demand for quality properties is exacerbated by increased migration and fewer home buyers, and this situation will unlikely change in the foreseeable future.  

Other factors leading to rents rising include lending restrictions on investors and the new Government changes around rental property compliance.  The Labour Government will also be cracking down on so-called ‘negative gearing’, where costs such as interest payments on a residential investment property can be used to offset tax owed on income from other sources.

Additionally, over the last few years there have also been extra costs for landlords such as rates and insurance increases,  and costs associated with drug testing of properties.  These factors, combined with more landlords exiting or choosing not to enter the market, means demand is high and supply is low, which leads to increasing rental prices.

Of course rising rents isn’t something new, the Trade Me Rent Price Index (a monthly analysis of the rental property market across NZ) shows that between December 2016 and December 2017 average rent rose 7.3%  in the Bay of Plenty.  However tenants shouldn’t be alarmed, as per our tenancy contracts, rent cannot be increased for 180 days from the start of the tenancy and a landlord is required to give 60 days notice of any increase in rent.  Usually rent increases for our tenants are small and gradual.

If you are a Landlord in this turbulent property market, we are happy to discuss your options for a long-term strategy.  Having the right plan and processes in place will to enable you to get through the next few years’ challenges and come out the other end in a stronger position. Remember, property investment is a long game and short-term losses or gains should form part of your overall long-term strategy.

For any other rental investment advice please phone us for a chat, we are happy to work through any questions you have and we offer free rental appraisals for landlords.

October 2017 Property Report From Realestate.co.nz

RealEstate.co.nz have released their October property report.  An interesting facts to note:

In October 2007 approx. 47,958 homes were available for sale in New Zealand. In 2017 ten years on, the total numbers of homes listed was only 24,307.

As has been discussed in many articles recently, the trend in New Zealand seems to be a move towards long-term renting rather than buying a home.  This trend of course is the ‘norm’ on many countries, especially in Europe, where families may rent a home for decades.

Here is the latest update, for the full report including graphs & maps please visit realestate.co.nz:

In October 2007, some 47,958 homes were available for sale in New Zealand on realestate.co.nz, the country’s largest property listing site.

Ten years on, the total numbers of homes listed has slumped to 24,307 (October 2017).

“The property market historically follows a cyclic trend, and this past decade has seen a steady increase in asking prices while the total stock for sale continues to fall,” says realestate.co.nz spokesperson, Vanessa Taylor.

“This is inspiring many Kiwis to think outside the square when it comes to letting go of the quarter acre dream, and recreating the notion of what makes a home,” she says.

“In October 2007, we were months away from entering the period of the global financial crisis.

“New Zealand got hit, albeit relatively lightly, but it was a period when lending was tight, house values dropped and new housing construction fell dramatically.

“The GFC hangover meant it took years for the property market to recover. Recently, as more Kiwis started to return to New Zealand permanently, along with the number of migrants from other countries, New Zealand found itself behind the eight ball when it came to sufficient housing numbers,” says Vanessa Taylor.

“It’s only in the last three years that the fall in available property for sale has been quite so significant,” she says.

In October 2014, total housing stock sat at 39,917, compared to 24,307 in October 2017, almost a 40 per cent fall.

“But it doesn’t mean that home ownership is out of reach.

“There is more creative thinking coming into our housing vernacular, such as the Tiny House movement, co-housing* with a central hub, as well as apartment and duplex options.

“The exciting thing is that as we move through to the next property cycle, we will have more options to suit our lifestyles, much like other large metropolitan cities across the world,” says Vanessa.

New property listings in October 2017 down 8.4 per cent

Real-time statistics from realestate.co.nz show that new property listings were down 8.4 per cent in October compared with the same month in 2016, with 10,778 homes newly listed for sale across the country.

“This is not a surprise. We have had a challenging winter and that dominated decisions, because people always want to show their homes in the best light.

“When there’s rain, wind and cool temperatures, prospective buyers tend not to venture out as much” says Vanessa.

“We also had an election with property as a significant focus, so it’s no surprise people would wait to see the outcomes.”

Every region in the North Island experienced a fall in new listings, with the exception of the Hawkes Bay which was up by 3.6 per cent compared to October 2016.

Auckland, which by its sheer size can impact the overall market nationally, experienced a 9.3 per cent fall in new listings. The 3,705 new listings were minimal in a market of this size.

In the South Island, Nelson registered the highest number of new listings for October compared to the same month in 2016, with 235 new listings.

Stock levels impacted by unique Auckland situation

While stock levels have been falling nationally over the past 10 years, in October 2017 they were up 3.9 per cent compared to the same month in 2016.

While new listings in Auckland fell 9.3 per cent compared to October 2016, total housing stock on the market increased by just over 17 per cent over the same period.

“Essentially this tells us that homes are not selling quickly in Auckland and this has had an overall impact on the national market,” says Vanessa Taylor.

This is also reflected in Auckland’s property asking price, which has been largely static over the past year (i.e. between zero and one 1% change in asking price each month). The average Auckland region asking price in October 2017 is $937,922.

“Auckland home owners are being realistic and nationally it’s still a sellers’ market, but less so in both the Auckland and Canterbury regions,” she says.

Theoretically, if no new listings came onto the market in Auckland and Canterbury and all existing listings were to be sold, there would be no houses for sale in both regions in 21 weeks. This is close to the long term average for both cities.

By contrast, if no new listings came onto the market in Wellington and all existing listings were sold, the capital city would have no houses for sale within nine weeks.

*Note: – Co-housing involves family homes being built in clusters of up to 35, around shared living spaces, gardens and communal facilities.